Agile and Defect


“We will deliver defect free software every time.”

Many software company have embraced some variant of this motto. This is the right thing to do … after all who wants software which has bugs. It is an open and shut case – right?

Or is it? … Especially in the context of agile development.

Let us start by asking two stupid question:

  • How do you measure number of defects?
  • When do you consider a software to be delivered?

Standard method of measuring defect is to:

  • Define and freeze the requirement
  • Derive test cases from the requirement
  • Use the test cases to test the software
  • Measure the number of test cases that has failed

Defect free software means all the identified test cases are passed.

  • But from the perspective of the user is this sufficient?
  • How do you draw the line between what has to be explicitly stated and is obvious but not stated?
  • When do you consider a delivery to have been made? After every sprint?
  • Can you ensure that every user story implemented in a sprint is without any defect?

These questions are not rhetorical. These questions need to be answered as in many organization developer performance measurement and even incentive depend measure of defect.

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Comments
2 Responses to “Agile and Defect”
  1. eswarann says:

    What is a defect – a creator would not ask – for him till he reaches perfection all are a defect.
    What is defect free ? – The tester would ask for an expected behaviour before passing judgement. If the requirement is to see X and you show X there is no defect

    The completeness comes later. ON the other hand if you strictly define each agile sprint a fully functional software then defect free is possible. So how you define requirements?

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